Anne Frank IV

Program Information

Series: A Moment in Time
Duration: 00:03:51
Year Produced: 2010
Description:

Just hours after Anne Frank and her family were discovered in their hiding place--the “secret annex”--and arrested by the Gestapo, two of the family’s helpers rescued Anne’s diary.

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Transcript

Lead: Just hours after Anne Frank and her family were discovered in their hiding place--the “secret annex”--and arrested by the Gestapo, two of the family’s helpers rescued Anne’s diary.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After being betrayed to the Nazis and their Dutch collaborators by an informer whose identity is still unknown, Anne Frank, her family and four others in hiding with them were eventually deported to concentration camps where they all perished except for Anne’s father, Otto Frank, who survived Auschwitz.

Hours after the arrest, Miep Gies and Bep Voskujl, two of Otto Frank’s loyal employees who helped sustain the fugitives for twenty-five months, quickly entered the ransacked secret annex before the Nazis could return. The two women collected personal effects of the Frank family including Anne’s papers, notebooks and her red-and-white plaid diary, which they found strewn on the floor.

Meip Gies kept Anne’s papers and diary in her drawer and hoped to be able to return them to Anne after the war. Anne had recently edited and rewritten some of her diary entries and intended to submit them for publication. She had heard a BBC radio broadcast that the experiences of the Dutch under Nazi occupation and oppression would be of great interest to readers after the war.

Otto Frank returned to Amsterdam and was reunited with the loyal friends who had risked so much to care for the group in the secret annex. After the Red Cross confirmed the deaths of Anne and her sister Margot at Bergen-Belsen, Miep Gies gave Anne’s diary and papers to Otto Frank. He was deeply touched by the depth of feeling and innermost thoughts expressed by his youngest daughter during their confinement. He prepared a transcription for the family in Switzerland. The diary was first published in 1947, and has since become one of the most widely-read books in the world, a testimony to courage and hope in the face of horrific and brutal atrocity.

Research by Ann Johnson, at the University of Richmond, this is Dan Roberts.