Anne Frank I

Program Information

Series: A Moment in Time
Duration: 00:03:32
Year Produced: 2010
Description:

Born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1929 (June 12), Annelies Marie Frank would not live to see her 16th birthday, but she left a powerful memoir of Jewish life in Nazi-occupied Europe, a legacy for the victims of the Holocaust.

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Transcript

Lead: Born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1929 (June 12), Annelies Marie Frank would not live to see her 16th birthday, but she left a powerful memoir of Jewish life in Nazi-occupied Europe, a legacy for the victims of the Holocaust.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Anne was the second of two daughters born to Otto and Edith Frank, a prosperous middle class Jewish-German couple. After the Nazis came to power in 1933 they began to implement systematic anti-Semitic legislation. Otto, convinced that conditions for Jews would get even worse, moved his family to Amsterdam, and there he started a food additives business. The Franks were happy in Amsterdam. They made good friends, the children attended good schools and all enjoyed family vacations. Otto’s business prospered.

In 1940, like some plague from the east, Germany invaded the Netherlands and began to issue anti-Jewish decrees. Frank was unable to secure visas so his family might emigrate to the United States. He began to plan for the worst case scenario. Jews had to register with the authorities, surrender their jobs, and give up their property; from 1942 on they were forced to wear yellow stars so as to be readily identified and isolated from the population.

Otto Frank secretly transferred the ownership of his company to his non-Jewish business associates and remained a silent partner. In the annex of his office building, Otto Frank began to seal off and prepare hidden rooms so the family could go into hiding if necessary to escape deportation to the death camps. In July 1942 Anne’s older sister, Margot--sixteen at the time, received a deportation notice. The family went into hiding.

Next Time: The “Secret Annex”

Research by Ann Johnson, at the University of Richmond, this is Dan Roberts.