Anne Frank III

Program Information

Series: A Moment in Time
Duration: 00:03:42
Year Produced: 2010
Description:

After twenty-five months of hiding from the Nazis in the secret annex behind their home in Amsterdam, Anne Frank and seven other Jewish fugitives were betrayed.

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Transcript

Lead: After twenty-five months of hiding from the Nazis in the secret annex behind their home in Amsterdam, Anne Frank and seven other Jewish fugitives were betrayed.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Through the long ordeal, four of Otto Frank’s most loyal and trusted employees sustained the group by smuggling in food, supplies, clothing, books and news from the outside world. Though there have been well-researched theories and speculation regarding the identity of the informer, a positive ID remains unknown to this day. Even though the “helpers” were organized, deliberate, and very careful in their activities, there were other employees working in the building and, of course, there were people in the neighborhood-- perhaps even Nazi sympathizers or those seeking to ingratiate themselves with the occupiers--who could have noticed unexplained traffic or provisions going in and out of the building. It would have taken only a single phone call to bring down the police on the little group living behind the bookcase.

On August 4, 1944, a Nazi Sergeant and three members of the Dutch Security Police, acting on the fatal tip, raided the hiding place. The eight occupants along with two of their protectors were arrested and the Jews eventually were sent to concentration camps.

Otto Frank was the sole survivor. Too ill to vacate Auschwitz in the forced “death march” of January 1945 as Soviet troops advanced, he was liberated. Earlier, Edith Frank had died of starvation at the same camp. Anne and Margot Frank, fifteen and eighteen respectively, died seven months after their arrest in a typhoid epidemic in the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp in northwestern Germany--sadly, tragically only one month before the camp was liberated by the British.

Next Time: Saving the Diary.

At the University of Richmond, this is Dan Roberts.